Title

Learning Efficacy in Engineering: Translating the Results of Research on Teaching and Learning into Classroom Practice

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2007

Publication Source

Global Journal of Engineering Education

Volume

11

Issue

1

Inclusive pages

7-14

Publisher

UNESCO * International Centre for Engineering Education

Place of Publication

Australia

ISBN/ISSN

13283154

Abstract

In this article, it is argued that, in order to enhance the learning efficacy of a class, the instructor and individual students need to work at it by establishing an inventory of teaching/learning skills and strategies, and improving them with practice. Mechanisms for doing so are discussed. The existence of a dynamic cycle of events that affects learning efficacy is proposed based upon the results of classroom experiments. Whether viewed from teaching or from learning, this cycle appears to consist of the same four elements, the relative strengths and weaknesses of which feed on each other to enhance or diminish learning efficacy, depending upon the circumstances. The four elements were identified as: prerequisite/subject Knowledge, Attitude, learning/teaching Skills, and study/ delivery Habits (KASH). When strong elements predominated weak ones, it was found that the combination created a stable (KASH) cycle that enhanced learning efficacy. However, when it was the reverse that held true, the KASH cycle became and remained unstable, and the interplay among its elements then undermined learning efficacy, resulting in suboptimal performance, even leading to academic failure in some cases.

Disciplines

Engineering

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