Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Summer 2015

Publication Source

Annales de Paléontologie

Volume

101

Issue

3

Inclusive pages

179–184

DOI

10.1016/j.annpal.2015.04.003

Publisher

Elsevier

Abstract

Polyfocal photography is a method for obtaining digital images that have great depth of focus. A series of photos are made at successive focal levels from the bottom to the top of a fossil using reflected light. Computer software takes the part of each image that is in focus and merges all of the parts into a composite image that is entirely in focus. Microscopes designed for this purpose are available but are expensive. A petrographic microscope with a digital camera can produce such a series of images, and they can be composited by an inexpensive computer program. Polyfocal photography appears to be superior to other methods of photography for illustrating conodonts. Composite images show internal features, such as basal cavities and white matter, and the software can convert one composite image into a stereoscopic pair.

Keywords

Polyfocal photography; Petrographic microscope; Conodonts; Cambrian; Ordovician

Disciplines

Earth Sciences | Paleontology | Photography

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