National Science Foundation Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Science Grant

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National Science Foundation Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Science Grant

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Description/Abstract

Coeur d'Alene (ISO 639-3 crd/Salish, USA, henceforth CRD) is a language no longer spoken by children. Ethnologue classifies this language as nearly extinct, with only two elderly native speakers. However, the Coeur d'Alene community has a strong interest in revitalizing the language. Under the direction of locally controlled language programs, a number of community members have passed through the language programs. In spite of the fact that Coeur d'Alene was, in the early part of the 20th century, one of the best-documented Salish languages, the community has access to precious little of this documentary material. Over 1,200 pages of unpublished field notes and typed manuscripts, along with a number of audio recordings, have sat collecting dust over the years since their collection. Various dictionaries and grammars, all prepared before the digital revolution, have been available only to the most determined researchers, but not to community members. The research team, group including linguists and Coeur d'Alene community members, will develop an online digital archive (already in pilot) to (1) preserve and (2) make appropriately accessible some of this wealth of resources in formats that can be utilized by scholars and community members alike. Funding will be utilized to expand the number of resources beyond those already in the pilot archive, and to bring the entire web repository into line with best practices for web archiving of language data.

Year Awarded

2012

Disciplines

Linguistics

College, School, or Center

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

English and Linguistics

Project Title

Collaborative Research: Coeur d'Alene Online Digital Resources

Funding Agency/Sponsor

National Science Foundation

Type of Award

Grant

Keywords

Coeur d'Alene

Special Interest

STEAM

National Science Foundation Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Science Grant

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