Title

Intergroup attitudes as a function of different dimensions of group identification and perceived intergroup conflict

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2002

Publication Source

Self and Identity

Volume

1

Issue

1

Inclusive pages

11-33

DOI

10.1080/152988602317232777

Abstract

This study investigates the multidimensional nature of group identity and how different dimensions are uniquely related to ingroup and outgroup evaluations, intergroup bias, and perceived intergroup conflict. A three-dimensional model of group identity—consisting of a cognitive, evaluative, and affective-ties component—was supported across ascribed, achieved, and face-to-face groups. As predicted, of the three dimensions, affective ties to the ingroup was the best overall predictor of intergroup bias. In support of social identity theory, the impact of the evaluative and cognitive dimensions on group attitudes was significantly moderated by perceptions of conflict. Additionally, as predicted, group identification led to exaggerated positive evaluations of the ingroup, while perceived conflict led to exaggerated negative evaluations of the outgroup. Theoretical implications and future research avenues are discussed.

Disciplines

Psychology

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