Title

The Effects of Jury Size, Evidence Complexity, and Note Taking on Jury Process and Performance in a Civil Trial

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-2002

Publication Source

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume

87

Issue

1

Inclusive pages

121-130

DOI

10.1037/0021-9010.87.1.121

Abstract

A total of 567 jury-eligible men and women who were assigned to 6- or 12-person juries saw a videotaped civil trial that contained either 1 or 4 plaintiffs. Half the juries took notes, whereas the remainder did not. Six-person juries that did not take notes awarded multiple plaintiffs the highest amounts of compensation. Six-person juries also gave the highest punitive damages when they did not take notes and judged multiple plaintiffs. The punitive awards of 6-person juries were highly variable compared with 12-person juries. Multiple plaintiffs also increased the unpredictability of jury punitive awards. Twelve-person juries deliberated longer, recalled more probative information, and relied less than 6-person juries on evaluative statements and nonprobative evidence. Limitations and implications are discussed.

Keywords

jury size, evidence complexity, number of plaintiffs, note taking, jury process, jury performance, civil trial

Disciplines

Psychology

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