Title

The Impact of Parental Attachment and Supervision on Fear of Crime Among Adolescent Males

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

Summer 2002

Publication Source

Adolescence

Volume

37

Issue

146

Inclusive pages

267-287

ISBN/ISSN

0001-8449

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of parental attachment and supervision on fear of crime among adolescent males. Earlier work has suggested that feelings of powerlessness and association with deviant peers have a significant impact on adolescent fear of crime. As the nature of the parent-adolescent relationship is also a key predictor of adolescent self-concept and quality of peer relationships, we felt that parental attachment and supervision should also impact fear of crime. Using self-report surveys from 318 incarcerated adolescent males, we examine the effect of parental attachment and supervision, along with other demographic and contextual variables, on fear of criminal victimization, perceived safety, and perceptions of risk. The results indicate that those boys who are most attached to their parents are less fearful of criminal victimization and feel safer in their environment than do their counterparts with weaker parental attachments. Additionally, those boys whose parents supervise them closely are more fearful of criminal victimization, but have lower levels of perceived risk of victimization. Implications and ramifications for social policies and future research are also discussed.

Disciplines

Psychology

This document is currently not available here.

  Contact Author

Share

COinS