Title

Gender Differences in Way-Finding Strategies: Relationship to Spatial Ability and Spatial Anxiety

Author(s)

Carol LawtonFollow

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1994

Publication Source

Sex Roles

Volume

30

Issue

11-12

Inclusive pages

765-779

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01544230

Abstract

Examined differences between women and men in the self-reported use of 2 way-finding strategies: route strategies and orientation strategies. 288 female and 138 male undergraduates completed the Mental Rotations Test, Water-Level Task, the Way-Finding Strategy Scale, and the Spatial Anxiety Scale. Women were more likely to report using a route strategy (attending to instructions on how to get from place to place), while men were more likely to report using an orientation strategy (maintaining a sense of their own position in relation to environmental reference points). Women also reported higher levels of spatial anxiety, or anxiety about environmental navigation. Orientation strategy was positively correlated with spatial perception ability and negatively correlated with spatial anxiety.

Keywords

Anxiety;Human Sex Differences, Spatial Ability, Spatial Orientation (Perception), Strategies

Disciplines

Psychology

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