Title

Individual and Gender-Related Differences in Indoor Wayfinding

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1996

Publication Source

Environment and Behavior

Volume

28

Issue

2

Inclusive pages

204-219

DOI

10.1177/0013916596282003

Abstract

The current study used a variety of behavioral and self-report measures to examine gender differences in way finding behavior following incidental leaming in an unfamiliar indoor environment. College students were led along a circuitous route and then asked to find their way back to the start. Choice of route back, comments made during the task, directional accuracy, and self-report after the task indicated three relatively efficient patterns of way finding and a distinctly inefficient pattern, characterized by frequent back-trailing, poor directional accuracy, and uncertainty about the task. Gender differences showed a discrepancy between measures of way finding efficiency and directional accuracy. Although there was no gender difference in choice of route back, men were significantly more accurate than women in locating the direction of the destination. Also, women reported significantly more uncertainty about carrying out the task.

Disciplines

Psychology

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