Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2017

Publication Source

South Asian Studies: A Research Journal of South Asian Studies

Volume

32

Issue

2

Inclusive pages

369-385

Publisher

University of the Punjab

ISBN/ISSN

1026 - 678X

Abstract

South Asians first began to arrive in the U.S. in large numbers fewer than 50 years ago. U.S. South Asian children experience acculturation differently from their parents. First-generation South Asian parents’ attempts to retain ethnic traditions through child rearing may result in intergenerational conflict. This collective case study considers South Asian immigrants’ experiences with and perspectives about child rearing, with particular emphasis on traditions surrounding dating and marriage. Emergent themes center around differences in gender role socialization, taboos associated with mixed-gender socialization, and children's deference to elders' authority. Dichotomies between collectivistic and individualist worldviews affecting socialization and familial dynamics are explored through immigrants’ own words.

Keywords

South Asian, U.S. immigration, marriage, adolescence

Disciplines

Education

Included in

Education Commons

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